Ecommerce Website Statistics: Shopping Cart Abandonment

ecommerce statistics shopping cart abandonment

Ever wonder how the big boys experience the dreaded “cart abandonment”.  Every ecommerce website owner knows the pain of almost converting a sale only to have the customer drop what they were doing and leave the website or abandon their shopping cart.

Baymard Institute, an independent web usability research institute, combined 37 studies to compile a list of e-commerce website shopping cart abandonment and some other interesting statistics.

Here is the list they came up with:

Source: Baymard Institute

78.00% according to Listrak in 2016 (retrieved Jan 9, 2017)
75.50% according to Adobe in 2016 (retrieved Jan 9, 2017)
68.80% according to Barilliance in 2016 (retrieved Jan 9, 2017)
74.52% according to SaleCycle in 2016 (retrieved Sep 21, 2016)
71.39% according to Barilliance in 2015 (retrieved Jan 14, 2016)
68.95% according to IBM in 2015 (retrieved Dec 7, 2015)
75.00% according to Listrak in 2015 (retrieved May 8, 2015)
75.60% according to SaleCycle in 2015 (retrieved May 8, 2015)
68.38% according to IBM in 2014 (retrieved Dec 2, 2014)
72.00% according to Listrak in 2014 (retrieved Sep 26, 2014)
69.20% according to Vibetrace in 2013 (retrieved Mar 25, 2014)
62.30% according to Fireclick in 2014 (retrieved Mar 12, 2014)
74.00% according to Barilliance in 2013 (retrieved Mar 12, 2014)
67.41% according to IBM / Coremetrics in 2013 (retrieved Dec 6, 2013)
78.00% according to AbandonAid in 2013 (retrieved Dec 6, 2013)
60.32% according to Triggered Messaging in 2013 (retrieved Jul 28, 2013)
75.00% according to Listrak in 2013 (retrieved Jul 3, 2013)
67.00% according to Comscore in 2012 (retrieved Jul 3, 2013)
74.23% according to SaleCycle in 2013 (retrieved Apr 26, 2013)
80.30% according to Rejoiner in 2012 (retrieved Feb 14, 2013)
61.85% according to IBM / Coremetrics in 2012 (retrieved Dec 20, 2012)
74.76% according to Fireclick / DigitalRiver in 2012 (retrieved Nov 2, 2012)
76.00% according to Listrak in 2012 (retrieved Jul 17, 2012)
72.31% according to Fireclick / DigitalRiver in 2011 (retrieved Feb 25, 2012)
62.31% according to IBM / Coremetrics in 2011 (retrieved Feb 25, 2012)
72.00% according to SeeWhy in 2011 (retrieved Feb 25, 2012)
71.00% according to SeeWhy in 2010 (retrieved Feb 25, 2012)
55.00% according to Forrester Research in 2010 (retrieved Feb 25, 2012)
63.68% according to IBM / Coremetrics in 2010 (retrieved Feb 25, 2012)
69.38% according to Fireclick / DigitalRiver in 2010 (retrieved Feb 25, 2012)
62.14% according to MarketLive in 2009 (retrieved Feb 25, 2012)
71.00% according to Forrester Research in 2009 (retrieved Feb 25, 2012)
63.19% according to IBM / Coremetrics in 2009 (retrieved Feb 25, 2012)
68.00% according to SeeWhy in 2009 (retrieved Feb 25, 2012)
62.01% according to IBM / Coremetrics in 2008 (retrieved Feb 25, 2012)
61.36% according to IBM / Coremetrics in 2007 (retrieved Feb 25, 2012)
59.80% according to MarketingSherpa in 2006 (retrieved Feb 25, 2012)

Average: 69.23% abandonment rate

That is a high abandonment rate from some big name brand websites.  I have to admit I was surprised that website users abandon their shopping carts at these websites at such a high rate.

According to Baymard 58.6% of US shoppers abandon shopping carts because they are “just browsing, not ready to buy”.  These are just the casual window shoppers that are inherit in the system.  There’s not much you can do to improve conversions for this type of shopper.

Outside of this “just browsing” group is where it gets very interesting and informative.  By a huge margin, if you seperate out the “just browsing” group, the next highest reason for cart abandonment was that extra costs at checkout were too high.  This includes shipping, taxes and fees.  This was the reason for 61% of the remaining abandonments almost twice the amount of the next highest reason, which was having to create an account.

The third highest reason for ecommerce website abandonment was too long or too complicated of a checkout process.  This accounted for 27% of abandonments when you remove the “just browsing” group.  This is significant because this problem is easily correctible.  Most checkout processes are easily streamlined with little work in the back end.

Some other interesting ecommerce website statistics:

  • Most cart abandonments occur on Tuesday.
  • The fewest cart abandonments are on Saturday.
  • Add-to-cart rates are highest on desktops and tablets
  • Add-to-cart rates overall were 2.5 percent in Q3 of 2016.

So if you are a small business owner who runs an ecommerce store don’t be deterred by abandoned shopping carts.  Work on little details that can improve user experience and know that everyone has to deal with shopping cart abandonment, even the big name brands.

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